If you’ve owned your home long enough to build up a significant amount of equity in it you may choose to leverage it as a home equity line of credit, or HELOC. The line of credit functions much like a credit card. You can use it to pay off remodeling expenses as you incur them, and you may then pay it down as you can afford to. This option may yield the lowest interest rates available, but you’ll need to plan to pay for closing costs as part of the project.
Difficulty getting a loan if you have bad credit or you’re self-employed: you might find it difficult to get approval for an unsecured home improvement loan if you have bad credit. This may also apply if you’re self-employed because you may not have the guarantee of fixed income to meet the monthly repayments. If you are approved, you may then find that you aren’t able to borrow as much as you wanted
3 LightStream will offer a rate .10 percentage points lower than the rate offered by a competing lender subject to satisfactory evidence being provided that you were actually approved for a lower rate with another lender for the same loan terms offered by LightStream by no later than 2 p.m. Eastern time one business day prior to loan funding. The Rate Beat program excludes secured or collateralized loan offers from any lender and the competitive offer must be generally available to any customer with a similar credit profile. Terms are subject to change at any time.
Home improvement loans are unsecured, meaning they’re approved based on the borrower’s credit history and income and do not require collateral. They are offered by online lenders, banks, or credit unions and work similarly to personal loans. Once approved, you’ll receive funding through direct deposit or paper check, and then be able to pay for your building supplies and contractors.
When you borrow money to build a house, there’s no collateral to back up the loan the way there is in a traditional mortgage — at least not yet. This makes lenders nervous, so you have to jump through some additional hoops before they’ll fork over the cash. Expect a thorough inspection of the architectural plans and your builder, as well as your finances.

Loan shopping often starts with mainstream mortgages from banks, credit unions, and brokers. Like all mortgages, they use your home as collateral and the interest on them is deductible. Unlike some, however, these loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or Veterans Administration (VA), or bought from your lender by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two corporations set up by Congress for that purpose. Referred to as A loans from A lenders, they have the lowest interest. The catch: You need A credit to get them. Because you probably have a mortgage on your home, any home improvement mortgage really is a second mortgage. That might sound ominous, but a second mortgage probably costs less than refinancing if the rate on your existing one is low. Find out by averaging the rates for the first and second mortgages. If the result is lower than current rates, a second mortgage is cheaper. When should you refinance? If your home has appreciated considerably and you can refinance with a lower-interest, 15-year loan. Or, if the rate available on a refinance is less than the average of your first mortgage and a second one. If you're not refinancing, consider these loan types:


Interest rates on personal loans generally range from about 6% to 36%. As with most credit products, the rate you receive depends a lot on your credit score. The better your score, the lower your rate and the less interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan. The interest rate also affects your total monthly payment, as does the term length; a longer term means lower monthly payments, but more interest.
Until recently, borrowing money for a new kitchen, second-story addition, or other home improvement meant going to the bank, seeing a loan officer, and hoping for the best. Today, however, you have many more options to help finance home improvements. A mortgage broker, for example, can offer more than 200 different loan programs. And brokers are just one of the many lenders eager to put together a loan that fits your situation—even if your credit history is less than perfect.

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Whether you hire a contractor or take on the work yourself, begin with an accurate estimate of what the project will cost. Lenders will insist on a specific figure before they work with you. If you're hiring a contractor, start with a firm bid, broken down into labor and materials. Then add on 10 percent for surprises. On work you'll do yourself, compile a detailed materials list with quantities, costs, and an accurate total. Include permit fees and equipment rental. Then add a cushion of 20 to 30 percent to be safe. Once you know how much you need to finance your home improvement project, how much will you get? Despite the promises and hype lenders make in their ads and promotional materials, how much you can borrow hinges on your credit rating, the loan-to-value ratio, and your income. These factors also help determine the interest rate, the length of the loan, and whether you'll pay points. Your credit rating. The best rates and terms go to homeowners with an A rating—no late payments in the last 12 months and no maxed-out credit cards. One or two late payments or overdrawn credit cards probably won't knock you out of the game, but you might end up with a higher interest rate and a smaller loan.
If you’ve owned your home long enough to build up a significant amount of equity in it you may choose to leverage it as a home equity line of credit, or HELOC. The line of credit functions much like a credit card. You can use it to pay off remodeling expenses as you incur them, and you may then pay it down as you can afford to. This option may yield the lowest interest rates available, but you’ll need to plan to pay for closing costs as part of the project.
The most straightforward way to finance a remodeling project is with a home improvement loan, which can be a conventional loan or an FHA-backed 203(k) loan, which is intended for homeowners who want to spruce up their homes. These loans are packaged separate from your mortgage, and offer different rates and terms than your mortgage. You’ll need to be approved separately, so your credit score and current debt will greatly impact your ability to secure a loan.
PrimeLending remodeling loans can help you turn the home you love into the home of your dreams. If you’re living in an older home that is now too small, needs repairs, remodeling or upgrades, PrimeLending remodeling loans are a type of refinancing loans that let you roll the costs of the work you do into your new mortgage. This helps make it easier to afford the repairs or upgrades without getting a separate loan, likely at a higher interest rate. You’ll still have just one simple mortgage payment. And in most cases, because you’re refinancing, you could likely end up with a lower interest rate, a shorter term, or possibly even lower monthly payments.
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