The Chase Home Equity Line of Credit features variable rates based on the Prime Rate (as published in The Wall Street Journal), which as of 12/20/2019, range from 5.00% APR to 7.64% APR for line amounts of $50,000 to $99,999, from 5.00% APR to 6.89% APR for line amounts of $100,000 to $149,999, from 5.00% APR to 6.89% APR for line amounts of $150,000 to $249,999, and from 5.00% APR to 6.89% APR for line amounts of $250,000 to $500,000. Rates vary depending upon credit line amount, lien position, and collateral location; please inquire about available rates in your area, and about rates for line amounts less than $50,000.
For a home equity line of credit, the best place to start is your own bank or credit union. Both usually offer lower rates to depositors. Check other sources to be sure. If you get a second mortgage, refinance, or opt for an FHA 203(k) mortgage, you're better off talking with a mortgage broker. A broker has more loan sources to choose from. When looking for a broker, check with people you know, and check any references you get. Contractors are another source of financing, but be wary: It's hard enough to choose a contractor and a loan when they're separate. And be suspicious of contractors who emphasize the monthly payment instead of the total cost of the job.
Home-equity lines of credit. These mortgages work kind of like credit cards: Lenders give you a ceiling to which you can borrow; then they charge interest on only the amount used. You can draw funds when you need them — a plus if your project spans many months. Some programs have a minimum withdrawal, while others have checkbook or credit-card access with no minimum. There are no closing costs. Interest rates are adjustable, with most tied to the prime rate. Most programs require repayment after 8 to 10 years. Banks, credit unions, brokerage houses, and finance companies all market these loans aggressively. Credit lines, fees, and interest rates vary widely, so shop carefully. Watch out for lenders that suck you in with a low initial rate, then jack it up. Find out how high the rate rises and how it's figured. And be sure to compare the total annual percentage rate (APR) and the closing costs separately. This differs from other mortgages, where costs, such as appraisal, origination, and title fees, are figured into a bottom-line APR for comparison.
Disclaimer: NerdWallet strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. This information may be different than what you see when you visit a financial institution, service provider or specific product’s site. All financial products, shopping products and services are presented without warranty. When evaluating offers, please review the financial institution’s Terms and Conditions. Pre-qualified offers are not binding. If you find discrepancies with your credit score or information from your credit report, please contact TransUnion® directly.
The most straightforward way to finance a remodeling project is with a home improvement loan, which can be a conventional loan or an FHA-backed 203(k) loan, which is intended for homeowners who want to spruce up their homes. These loans are packaged separate from your mortgage, and offer different rates and terms than your mortgage. You’ll need to be approved separately, so your credit score and current debt will greatly impact your ability to secure a loan.
Until recently, borrowing money for a new kitchen, second-story addition, or other home improvement meant going to the bank, seeing a loan officer, and hoping for the best. Today, however, you have many more options to help finance home improvements. A mortgage broker, for example, can offer more than 200 different loan programs. And brokers are just one of the many lenders eager to put together a loan that fits your situation—even if your credit history is less than perfect.
Your loan terms are not guaranteed and are subject to our verification of your identity and credit information. To obtain a loan, you must submit additional documentation including an application that may affect your credit score. Rates will vary based on many factors, such as your creditworthiness (for example, credit score and credit history) and the length of your loan (for example, rates for 36 month loans are generally lower than rates for 72 month loans). Only the most creditworthy applicants qualify for the lowest rates and largest loans amounts. Your maximum loan amount may vary depending on your loan purpose, income and creditworthiness. Your verifiable income must support your ability to repay your loan. Marcus by Goldman Sachs® is a brand of Goldman Sachs Bank USA and all loans are issued by Goldman Sachs Bank USA, Salt Lake City Branch. Applications are subject to additional terms and conditions.
This is great guys! Great work! I'm a retired kitchen guy so I know good work when I see it. I love all of it. My wife and I are doing a Farm kitchen right now as well. Your pictures have me thinking about sending in some before and after of ours. Just like you its the time we get to spend together during the project that makes the whole thing worth while. Great work. I cant say it enough!

Great tips. At the onset of explaining various causes of a squeak, Tom Silva says it can be alignment, either of the door-to-hinge, or hinge-to-hinge. Hmm, seems to me those two scenarios different than the case in the vid, that being singular hinge with the barrels out of alignment. So, the vid shows a great solution to fixing out of alignment barrels, but what about fixing doors with hinges out of alignment from each other, or hinges out of alighment on the door? How do you make that determinations, and what is the solution? thx
After the kitchen, you may want to think about remodeling your existing bathroom. If your house is older, you may be sporting pink, blue or avocado tile or outdated fixtures. Even if your home is newer, styles can change. Invest in neutral-colored tile and give the room some personality with a fresh coat of paint, wall hangings and a new shower curtain. Update lighting fixtures and install a low-flow toilet to save on the water bill. You may even want to add a new vanity and matching mirror.
Additionally Chase customers can qualify for a rate discount of 0.12% with automatic payment to their home equity account from their Chase checking account. To be eligible for a 0.12% rate discount, before closing, a customer must: (1) have an existing or open a new Chase personal checking account, and (2) enroll in the Chase automatic payment service for home equity accounts. With this service, their home equity account payment will be automatically deducted from their Chase personal checking account. Payments must go directly from a Chase personal checking account to the Chase home equity account and can't be managed by third parties.
Home improvement loans are unsecured, meaning they’re approved based on the borrower’s credit history and income and do not require collateral. They are offered by online lenders, banks, or credit unions and work similarly to personal loans. Once approved, you’ll receive funding through direct deposit or paper check, and then be able to pay for your building supplies and contractors.
×