Still, there are several other factors to consider. The first is that Marcus caps home improvement loans at $40,000, so if you need more to fund an extensive project, Marcus may not be the right lender for you. It can also take Marcus five business days to fund your loan, which means you’re in for a longer wait than you will be with lenders like Earnest.
Advertised rates are tied to the Prime Rate published in The Wall Street Journal, effective as of 12/20/2019. The Prime Rate has a direct relationship to the Federal Funds Rate established by the Federal Reserve Board’s Federal Open Markets Committee. Any change in the Federal Funds Rate effective on or after 12/20/2019, will directly affect the Prime Rate published in The Wall Street Journal, as well as the rates advertised here. Therefore, depending on the date that you apply, the advertised rates can't be available.
When you borrow money to build a house, there’s no collateral to back up the loan the way there is in a traditional mortgage — at least not yet. This makes lenders nervous, so you have to jump through some additional hoops before they’ll fork over the cash. Expect a thorough inspection of the architectural plans and your builder, as well as your finances.
Additionally Chase customers can qualify for a rate discount of 0.12% with automatic payment to their home equity account from their Chase checking account. To be eligible for a 0.12% rate discount, before closing, a customer must: (1) have an existing or open a new Chase personal checking account, and (2) enroll in the Chase automatic payment service for home equity accounts. With this service, their home equity account payment will be automatically deducted from their Chase personal checking account. Payments must go directly from a Chase personal checking account to the Chase home equity account and can't be managed by third parties.
Loan shopping often starts with mainstream mortgages from banks, credit unions, and brokers. Like all mortgages, they use your home as collateral and the interest on them is deductible. Unlike some, however, these loans are insured by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or Veterans Administration (VA), or bought from your lender by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two corporations set up by Congress for that purpose. Referred to as A loans from A lenders, they have the lowest interest. The catch: You need A credit to get them. Because you probably have a mortgage on your home, any home improvement mortgage really is a second mortgage. That might sound ominous, but a second mortgage probably costs less than refinancing if the rate on your existing one is low. Find out by averaging the rates for the first and second mortgages. If the result is lower than current rates, a second mortgage is cheaper. When should you refinance? If your home has appreciated considerably and you can refinance with a lower-interest, 15-year loan. Or, if the rate available on a refinance is less than the average of your first mortgage and a second one. If you're not refinancing, consider these loan types:
These FHA-insured loans allow you to simultaneously refinance the first mortgage and combine it with the improvement costs into a new mortgage. They also base the loan on the value of a home after improvements, rather than before. Because your house is worth more, your equity and the amount you can borrow are both greater. And you can hire a contractor or do the work yourself. The downside is that loan limits vary by county and tend to be relatively low. The usual term is 30 years.
We know from personal experience that a large number of older homes in Northern and Southern California are still in great shape and can be updated, upgraded and expanded to meet the needs of a growing family. It’s a great solution for families that love their neighborhoods and the cost of renovation is usually substantially less than the cost of purchasing a larger home.
×