Tools and Calculators: Tools and calculators are provided as a courtesy to help you estimate your financial needs. The results yielded by these tools and calculators are merely estimates and they don’t guarantee available credit amount, potential savings or the like. Chase makes no warranty regarding the tools or calculators, nor regarding the results they produce. Should you have any questions about your financial situation, Chase strongly recommends that you consult with your own financial advisor.
Whether you want to spruce up your home, do a total renovation or just fix up that outdated bathroom, you're probably bracing yourself for steep home improvement costs. If you've built equity in your home, however, you can access that equity for those new countertops or landscaping with a home improvement loan. These home renovation loans feature low interest rates and repayment periods that can bring your dream renovations within reach. Put your low home improvement loan rate to work and liven up your living space with these great remodeling tips.
Whether you hire a contractor or take on the work yourself, begin with an accurate estimate of what the project will cost. Lenders will insist on a specific figure before they work with you. If you're hiring a contractor, start with a firm bid, broken down into labor and materials. Then add on 10 percent for surprises. On work you'll do yourself, compile a detailed materials list with quantities, costs, and an accurate total. Include permit fees and equipment rental. Then add a cushion of 20 to 30 percent to be safe. Once you know how much you need to finance your home improvement project, how much will you get? Despite the promises and hype lenders make in their ads and promotional materials, how much you can borrow hinges on your credit rating, the loan-to-value ratio, and your income. These factors also help determine the interest rate, the length of the loan, and whether you'll pay points. Your credit rating. The best rates and terms go to homeowners with an A rating—no late payments in the last 12 months and no maxed-out credit cards. One or two late payments or overdrawn credit cards probably won't knock you out of the game, but you might end up with a higher interest rate and a smaller loan.
Chase customers who secure a new Chase home equity line of credit can save 0.25% off the standard variable home equity line of credit rate with qualifying personal deposit accounts including Chase personal checking and savings accounts, CDs, certain Chase Retirement CDs, or certain Chase Retirement Money Market Accounts. Qualifying personal investments include investment and annuity products offered by JPMorgan Chase & Co. or its affiliates and agencies. Balances in Chase Money Purchase Pension and Profit Sharing Plans don't qualify.
Some of that affordability is negated, though, by Prosper’s loan origination fee. This lender charges a fee based on your credit profile, which could cost you anywhere from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars depending on your credit score and how much you need to borrow. Other lenders offer lower interest rates and don’t charge loan origination fees, so make sure you weigh all the factors if you decide to go with Prosper for your loan.

Your home improvement ideas are as unique as you are and our range of financing options can help you realize those ideas in the way that makes the most sense for you. Narrow down your options using the information below and remember our financing representatives are available to answer any questions. Be sure to consider the costs associated with each option, including interest rate, when choosing a product.
Your debt-to-income ratio: You can calculate your DTI by dividing all of your monthly debt payments by your monthly income. Lenders generally consider a DTI of 36 percent or less to be acceptable, but many lenders will consider borrowers with higher ratios, depending on their income. Anything getting close to 50 percent, though, may disqualify you.
Your credit score: It’s smart to know what are your chances of qualifying before you apply for a loan. Get a free copy of your credit report from each of the major credit-reporting bureaus: Equifax, TransUnion and Experian. You are entitled to one free report a year from each bureau. The most favorable rates go to borrowers with the best credit scores. Every lender you apply with will check your credit score and credit history.
With a low home improvement loan rate available, now's the perfect time to get started on those remodeling projects you've been putting off. However, while you're renovating your home, be careful not to add things that would price your home out of the range of your neighborhood. For example, if you own a bungalow in a neighborhood where sale prices don't top $125,000, reconsider adding a master suite fit for a mansion. You may not recoup that investment when buyers can get very similar homes on the same street for less. Even in a neighborhood where homes sell for $1 million, adding exotic hardwood floors or marble drives and walkways could still push your home's price higher than the average, making it harder for you to sell someday.
These FHA-insured loans allow you to simultaneously refinance the first mortgage and combine it with the improvement costs into a new mortgage. They also base the loan on the value of a home after improvements, rather than before. Because your house is worth more, your equity and the amount you can borrow are both greater. And you can hire a contractor or do the work yourself. The downside is that loan limits vary by county and tend to be relatively low. The usual term is 30 years.
All of these options are One Time Close offerings.  This gives our clients the advantage and peace of mind of not having to worry about re-qualifying for permanent financing when their build is complete.  There’s no new credit checks, appraisals or closing costs; everything that needed to be done is already done, so your construction loan simply rolls into your permanent loan at the completion of your remodel.
Until recently, borrowing money for a new kitchen, second-story addition, or other home improvement meant going to the bank, seeing a loan officer, and hoping for the best. Today, however, you have many more options to help finance home improvements. A mortgage broker, for example, can offer more than 200 different loan programs. And brokers are just one of the many lenders eager to put together a loan that fits your situation—even if your credit history is less than perfect.
B and C loans. What if you have less than A credit or don't fit the usual employment or income mold? B and C loans are a fallback. While many banks offer them, so do credit unions, brokerage houses, and finance companies. You'll also find lenders that push B and C loans for debt consolidation with enticing introductory rates. Beware, though: Total interest and fees tend to be high because of the lenders' added risk. And since B and C loans lack consistent requirements and terms, comparing them is difficult.
When you borrow money to build a house, there’s no collateral to back up the loan the way there is in a traditional mortgage — at least not yet. This makes lenders nervous, so you have to jump through some additional hoops before they’ll fork over the cash. Expect a thorough inspection of the architectural plans and your builder, as well as your finances.
The most straightforward way to finance a remodeling project is with a home improvement loan, which can be a conventional loan or an FHA-backed 203(k) loan, which is intended for homeowners who want to spruce up their homes. These loans are packaged separate from your mortgage, and offer different rates and terms than your mortgage. You’ll need to be approved separately, so your credit score and current debt will greatly impact your ability to secure a loan.
Interest rates. The less interest you pay, the more loan you can afford. An adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) is one way to lower that rate, at least temporarily. Because lenders aren't locked into a fixed rate for 30 years, ARMs start off with much lower rates. But the rates can change every 6, 12, or 24 months thereafter. Most have yearly caps on increases and a ceiling on how high the rate climbs. But if rates climb quickly, so will your payments.

You may also consider refinancing your home in order to finance a home improvement project. Many banks offer refinancing and renovation options that allow you to roll home improvement costs into your mortgage, even if you don’t have a lot of equity in your home. By basing the mortgage on the home’s renovated value rather than the current value, you’ll be able to finance everything with one loan. If you’re a do-it-yourself type, however, you’re out of luck: Many banks require you to hire a professional contractor to perform the work as part of a refinancing and renovation package.
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Before applying, be sure to check your credit history for inaccuracies, and if you find any, dispute them. You’ll want to make sure your credit is in tip top shape so you can get the best rate from lenders. If your credit score is subprime, consider a bad credit loan instead. It’s also important to get a few estimates prior to applying for a loan so you have an idea of how much money you need to get the job done.
Home improvement becomes necessary after few years. To update already existing home money is necessary which can be acquired through home improvement loans. General repairs, repainting, building a swimming pool or a deck, enlarging the existing area of the house or anything similar is done through home improvement loans easily. Home improvements also increase the value of the home. Sometimes though, over improvement is risky. It is difficult to rent a house that is more expensive than other houses in the neighborhood. Mainstream homebuyers do not go for very grand and expensive tastes. So these things have to be considered seriously.
The Chase Home Equity Line of Credit features variable rates based on the Prime Rate (as published in The Wall Street Journal), which as of 12/20/2019, range from 5.00% APR to 7.64% APR for line amounts of $50,000 to $99,999, from 5.00% APR to 6.89% APR for line amounts of $100,000 to $149,999, from 5.00% APR to 6.89% APR for line amounts of $150,000 to $249,999, and from 5.00% APR to 6.89% APR for line amounts of $250,000 to $500,000. Rates vary depending upon credit line amount, lien position, and collateral location; please inquire about available rates in your area, and about rates for line amounts less than $50,000.
Only you can decide if your home improvement or repair is worth it to you. Some homeowners place a higher personal value on enjoying their living space while they occupy the home; for some, it is important to recover a greater percentage of renovation costs when they sell the home. Remember, a number of factors may determine whether you recover some or all of your expenses.
There are several types of loans that can be used for house remodeling. Many homeowners take out a home equity loan or home equity line of credit (HELOC) for that purpose. The home is collateral for the loan. Because of this, rates are typically lower. One could even use credit cards for home improvements, but the cost likely would be prohibitive. Each loan has advantages and disadvantages.
Home remodeling loans offer an influx of cash for homeowners with big remodeling plans but pocketbooks that won't quite stretch far enough for costly home improvements. When you own a home, remodeling loans can make it possible to build on an addition, put in skylights, add a pool or make any change you want.  But you should know what to expect before jumping in and signing on the dotted line of a home improvement loan.
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Additionally Chase customers can qualify for a rate discount of 0.12% with automatic payment to their home equity account from their Chase checking account. To be eligible for a 0.12% rate discount, before closing, a customer must: (1) have an existing or open a new Chase personal checking account, and (2) enroll in the Chase automatic payment service for home equity accounts. With this service, their home equity account payment will be automatically deducted from their Chase personal checking account. Payments must go directly from a Chase personal checking account to the Chase home equity account and can't be managed by third parties.
It's been a few years since I painted anything in anger, but back when I did, there was a trick I'd use when protecting carpet. Round the edge of the carpet, right up against the baseboard, I'd run a 1 1/2 or 2 painter's tape, and let the tape stick slightly to the board. Then I'd go round with the broadest taping knife I had, and tuck the tape down hard. That left the carpet edge protected and rounded over and the tape was now creating a line along the baseboard *below* the level of the carpet. Then I'd sheet up as usual.That made it super easy to paint the baseboard, the bottom edge didn't need cutting in! Just work the pain in there! If the bottom edge was a little messy and uneven, who cared? Once the paint was thoroughly dry, the tape was lifted (carefully, to not pull the carpet off the gripper) and the carpet would bounce up and hide the bottom edge of the paint. A perfect look, quicker and safer than trying to cut in along a fuzzy carpet edge.
Many websites are available where a lot of information can be acquired about the lenders in and around the place where you stay. There are different guidelines to be followed in different places. In Alaska and Washington for example, the maximum amount should not exceed $25,000. All the aspects should meet the FHA title I program requirements. The lien status and the title review to confirm the ownership are required.
Home remodeling loans offer an influx of cash for homeowners with big remodeling plans but pocketbooks that won't quite stretch far enough for costly home improvements. When you own a home, remodeling loans can make it possible to build on an addition, put in skylights, add a pool or make any change you want.  But you should know what to expect before jumping in and signing on the dotted line of a home improvement loan.
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